I'm shapeshifting from place to place, bending time, curving space


Tatau O Te Po - Electro Records Limited Edition.

Mokotron Tatau O Te Po - Electro Records Limited Edition

Electro Records
ZZ03-36LE
6 Tracks


12''
EP - Electro Records Limited Edition EXCLUSIVE

Sold Out 19,49 19,99

 LIMITED EDITION EXCLUSIVE ELECTRO RECORDS - ONLY 24 UNITS!!

Ezzential Electro is the biggest project Electro Records faced so far. In the next moths we will release 36 vinyl records produced by artists we consider an essential piece of the puzzle to understand the current underground electro movement and they start with the last artists we know from the Sci Fi Electro and Electro Transmissions: Sound Synthesis, Transpac, Mokotron, Noamm, N-Ter and -=UHU=-.  Six vinyl records silkscreen printed and with a real puzzle piece in the front cover that indicates the number of the record you have in your hands to do not lose the track!

ALSO AVAILABLE FULL BOX WITH THE 36 VINYL RECORDS BOX HERE:  https://www.electro-records.com/catalogo/ezzential-electro/660/
______

 MOKOTRON - Tatau O Te Po - EP

Electro Records welcomes Mokotron por la puerta grande with Ezzential Electro, this project was created to give you a true vision about the underground electro movement world wide and Mokotron is the best possible example, please check the words of Mokotron about this work and his roots:

|||||   Mokotron about Tatau Te Po  |||||

Ko Motatau te maunga, Taikirau te awa, Manu Koroki te whare.
Ko Ngati Hine te hapu, Ngapuhi Nui Tonu te iwi.
Ko Mokotron toku ingoa, i tipu ake au ki Tamaki i raro i te maru o Ngati Whatua.


Mokotron is an exploration of what it means to be an Indigenous Maori person in urban spaces, combining elements of Electro and Bass music with my Indigenous language Te Reo Maori and traditional instruments and pre-European chants. Maori are the Indigenous people of Aotearoa and Te Waipounamu, two islands in the South Pacific that were invaded and colonised by Europeans in the 19th century and renamed ‘New Zealand’.

“In my Indigenous language, I am a member of Ngati Hine, a tribe of the sovereign nation of Ngapuhi. I grew up and live in the city of Tamaki, on the ancestral lands of Ngati Whatua.

In my day-to-day life, my primary role is being a father to my two daughters. Secondary to that I am a lecturer in Maori and Indigenous Studies, and I’ve committed my life to sharing our Indigenous history and culture as a way of transforming Indigenous realities and conscientizing our non-Indigenous allies.

Mokotron is a creative expression of these goals. Creative expression is a space where Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultures can combine in ways that enhance rather than destroy wellbeing; it is a space where Indigenous peoples can be their ancestors; it can be a decolonizing space where non-oppressive relationships can be built; and it is a space that has inspired innovation, excellence and celebration of Maori culture over generations. If creative expression is one of the few spaces that has seen innovation, wellbeing and the enhancement of communities as a consequence of contact then Indigenous struggles for independence must be inherently creative.

The Tatau o te Po EP is an expression of international influences and local issues. Like so many communities, our people were swept up in the first wave of Electro that swept through the streets in the early 80s and carried on with its regional variants – Miami Bass, Detroit Techno Bass and Ghettotech, Baile Funk, UK Electro and the angular abstractions echoing from Europe. Left and Right is an impression of the imprint the movie Beat Street left on my mind in 1984. Dawn of Bass takes its lyrics from the flyer for our first Electro club night I ran with local crew Go Nuclear in the late 90s.

835 Bass Militia is talking about the situation in my hood right now, where every night the sounds of Police sirens, Police helicopters, gunshots, car chases and siren speakers attached to cars as part of a local sub-culture ring through the streets. Colonised Existence express the trauma, tensions and turmoil of living a colonized existence as an urban Indigenous person and the distress of being cut off from your culture. Doctrine of Recovery asks, how do we as Indigenous peoples recover from the Doctrine of Discovery? Just as the Doctrine of Discovery outlines a series of legal justifications for colonial imperialism and settler violence, this song lists a series of actions we can undertake to recover from colonisation: speak our Indigenous language, hold on to our customs, sing our songs, chant our chants, take care of the land and sea, treasure our children and elders, support our Indigenous relations without belittling them, hold on to the treasures of the past, protect the land, uplift the people.

Tatau o te Po, the title track, reaches into the creation traditions of our people, recalling that the first human Hine Titama the dawn maiden fled from the world of light into the darkness to become a gateway to the spirit realm for her descendants. The song explores the spiritual power of Indigenous women as the source of all life and the protectors and leaders of our communities, and celebrates darkness as the darkness of the womb, from which all life comes and to which all life returns, a place of growth, gestation and protection for us living in the turmoil of modern life.

This song was a breakthrough for me thematically and aesthetically – it starts with the haunting sounds of taonga puoro, our traditional musical instruments, it is written entirely in the Maori language, and it draws on Maori creation traditions for its themes.  Every artist goes through the process of drawing inspiration from their predecessors, and the influence of artists like Aux 88, Keith Tucker, Arthur Baker, Freestyle, Mike Banks, Anthony Rother, Kraftwerk and DMX Krew is clear in my music. BUT, if we do not create our own style, our own aesthetic, our own themes, we are taking from others without giving back, we contribute nothing to the creativity and continuation of the culture. Tatau o te Po was the breakthrough for me – after writing this song I have focused on creating my own style of Electro, combining traditional instruments and chants and drawing on our creation traditions, that listeners will hear in my upcoming releases.

Mokotron – Dark, problematic, trauma driven Indigenous Bass straight outta Tamaki Makaurau”
 

 LIMITED EDITION EXCLUSIVE ELECTRO RECORDS - ONLY 24 UNITS!!

Ezzential Electro is the biggest project Electro Records faced so far. In the next moths we will release 36 vinyl records produced by artists we consider an essential piece of the puzzle to understand the current underground electro movement and they start with the last artists we know from the Sci Fi Electro and Electro Transmissions: Sound Synthesis, Transpac, Mokotron, Noamm, N-Ter and -=UHU=-.  Six vinyl records silkscreen printed and with a real puzzle piece in the front cover that indicates the number of the record you have in your hands to do not lose the track!

ALSO AVAILABLE FULL BOX WITH THE 36 VINYL RECORDS BOX HERE:  https://www.electro-records.com/catalogo/ezzential-electro/660/
______

 MOKOTRON - Tatau O Te Po - EP

Electro Records welcomes Mokotron por la puerta grande with Ezzential Electro, this project was created to give you a true vision about the underground electro movement world wide and Mokotron is the best possible example, please check the words of Mokotron about this work and his roots:

|||||   Mokotron about Tatau Te Po  |||||

Ko Motatau te maunga, Taikirau te awa, Manu Koroki te whare.
Ko Ngati Hine te hapu, Ngapuhi Nui Tonu te iwi.
Ko Mokotron toku ingoa, i tipu ake au ki Tamaki i raro i te maru o Ngati Whatua.


Mokotron is an exploration of what it means to be an Indigenous Maori person in urban spaces, combining elements of Electro and Bass music with my Indigenous language Te Reo Maori and traditional instruments and pre-European chants. Maori are the Indigenous people of Aotearoa and Te Waipounamu, two islands in the South Pacific that were invaded and colonised by Europeans in the 19th century and renamed ‘New Zealand’.

“In my Indigenous language, I am a member of Ngati Hine, a tribe of the sovereign nation of Ngapuhi. I grew up and live in the city of Tamaki, on the ancestral lands of Ngati Whatua.

In my day-to-day life, my primary role is being a father to my two daughters. Secondary to that I am a lecturer in Maori and Indigenous Studies, and I’ve committed my life to sharing our Indigenous history and culture as a way of transforming Indigenous realities and conscientizing our non-Indigenous allies.

Mokotron is a creative expression of these goals. Creative expression is a space where Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultures can combine in ways that enhance rather than destroy wellbeing; it is a space where Indigenous peoples can be their ancestors; it can be a decolonizing space where non-oppressive relationships can be built; and it is a space that has inspired innovation, excellence and celebration of Maori culture over generations. If creative expression is one of the few spaces that has seen innovation, wellbeing and the enhancement of communities as a consequence of contact then Indigenous struggles for independence must be inherently creative.

The Tatau o te Po EP is an expression of international influences and local issues. Like so many communities, our people were swept up in the first wave of Electro that swept through the streets in the early 80s and carried on with its regional variants – Miami Bass, Detroit Techno Bass and Ghettotech, Baile Funk, UK Electro and the angular abstractions echoing from Europe. Left and Right is an impression of the imprint the movie Beat Street left on my mind in 1984. Dawn of Bass takes its lyrics from the flyer for our first Electro club night I ran with local crew Go Nuclear in the late 90s.

835 Bass Militia is talking about the situation in my hood right now, where every night the sounds of Police sirens, Police helicopters, gunshots, car chases and siren speakers attached to cars as part of a local sub-culture ring through the streets. Colonised Existence express the trauma, tensions and turmoil of living a colonized existence as an urban Indigenous person and the distress of being cut off from your culture. Doctrine of Recovery asks, how do we as Indigenous peoples recover from the Doctrine of Discovery? Just as the Doctrine of Discovery outlines a series of legal justifications for colonial imperialism and settler violence, this song lists a series of actions we can undertake to recover from colonisation: speak our Indigenous language, hold on to our customs, sing our songs, chant our chants, take care of the land and sea, treasure our children and elders, support our Indigenous relations without belittling them, hold on to the treasures of the past, protect the land, uplift the people.

Tatau o te Po, the title track, reaches into the creation traditions of our people, recalling that the first human Hine Titama the dawn maiden fled from the world of light into the darkness to become a gateway to the spirit realm for her descendants. The song explores the spiritual power of Indigenous women as the source of all life and the protectors and leaders of our communities, and celebrates darkness as the darkness of the womb, from which all life comes and to which all life returns, a place of growth, gestation and protection for us living in the turmoil of modern life.

This song was a breakthrough for me thematically and aesthetically – it starts with the haunting sounds of taonga puoro, our traditional musical instruments, it is written entirely in the Maori language, and it draws on Maori creation traditions for its themes.  Every artist goes through the process of drawing inspiration from their predecessors, and the influence of artists like Aux 88, Keith Tucker, Arthur Baker, Freestyle, Mike Banks, Anthony Rother, Kraftwerk and DMX Krew is clear in my music. BUT, if we do not create our own style, our own aesthetic, our own themes, we are taking from others without giving back, we contribute nothing to the creativity and continuation of the culture. Tatau o te Po was the breakthrough for me – after writing this song I have focused on creating my own style of Electro, combining traditional instruments and chants and drawing on our creation traditions, that listeners will hear in my upcoming releases.

Mokotron – Dark, problematic, trauma driven Indigenous Bass straight outta Tamaki Makaurau”
 

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